Click to Watch in HD > Asian leaders meet Raul Castro

Watch 1.Mid of Thailand Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra shaking hands with Acting President of Cuba Raul Castro 2.Various of Malaysias Prime Minister Abdullah Ahmad Badawi shaking hands and talking with Raul Castro 3.Various of Laoss president Choummaly Sayasone shaking hands and talking with Raul Castro 4.Wide of presidents and delegates at Convention Centre 5.SOUNDBITE (English) Thaksin Shinawatra, Thailand Prime Minister: Finally the NAM (Non Aligned Movement) partnership with the United Nations must be strengthened. Nam continues to contribute to the UN form is crucial to ensure that the UN is stronger more effective and more democratic. No less important is the need for an effective UN secretary general who can lead the organisation in fulfilling the charter mandates and implementing its reform. Bearing that in mind the Association of South East Asians or ASEAN with its ten member countries believes that its candidate Thailands deputy prime minister Doctor Surakiart Sathirathai is the most appropriate choice for the UN at this critical period in its history. 6.Wide of presidents and delegates at the Convention Centre STORYLINE The need to make the United Nations more democratic is one debate on which everybody seemed to agree at the Non-aligned Movement summit in Cuba this week. Raul Castro sat in for his ailing older brother and led many of the worlds leaders in harshly criticising the United States veto power in the UN Security Council. At the summit Thailands Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra, reaffirmed that Association of South East Asian Nations (ASEAN) believed their candidate should be the next secretary general of the United Nations ASEAN with its ten member countries believes that its candidate Thailands deputy prime minister Doctor Surakiart Sathirathai is the most appropriate choice for the UN at this critical period in its history, Shinawatra said. Some leaders also took steps at the summit to resolve difficult disputes. Pakistan and India agreed on Saturday to restart peace talks suspended since train bombings killed more than 200 people in Mumbai in July as part of a wave of attacks that India blamed on Pakistan-based militants. Describing their meeting as a breakthrough for peace, Pakistani president General Pervez Musharraf and Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh agreed on Cabinet-level talks between their foreign secretaries. Prime Minister Singh has accepted an invitation to travel to Pakistan to further the process. Others held onto hardline positions: a top North Koreas official defended his countrys nuclear weapons program; Sudans leader rejected a UN peacekeeping mission in Darfur, and Irans president insisted on his nations right to enrich uranium for nuclear energy. But the top priority for these less powerful nations seems to be balancing US powers of veto on the UN Security Council. UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan, who has been trying to manage a showdown between the United States and Iran over its enrichment of uranium, agreed with the leaders that the security council must be more responsive to less powerful countries. The Non-aligned Movement was formed during the Cold War to establish a neutral third path in a world divided by the United States and the Soviet Union. With Haiti and St. Kitts joining this week, it now counts 118 member nations. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/6de4b097688ade2b13cf1e003f157451 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork

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